Zambia

MENTAL DISORDERS ACT OF ZAMBIA MUST BE DECLARED NULL AND VOID

Guest Blog post by Wamundila Waliuya, Founding President – Disability Rights Watch Many African countries are currently being governed using laws which were passed during the pre-independence period. Essentially, this means that countries are running using colonial rules and laws. Specifically, many countries have got mental health laws that are …» Read More

Reaching for Zero Discrimination in Healthcare

          1 March is Zero Discrimination Day, a day to celebrate diversity and strengthen our resolve for inclusive societies free from discrimination and inequality. The impact of stigma and discrimination has been catastrophic in the fight against HIV/AIDS. When discrimination occurs in healthcare facilities or at …» Read More

Promoting Freedom from Fear on International Albinism Awareness Day

By Annabel Raw 13 June is International Albinism Awareness Day. It is described as a day in which people worldwide celebrate the human rights of people living with albinism. In southern Africa, there is much work to be done before we can celebrate. About 1 in 5,000 people in sub-Saharan …» Read More

USING THE COURTS TO PROTECT VULNERABLE PEOPLE: PERSPECTIVES FROM THE JUDICIARY AND LEGAL PROFESSION IN BOTSWANA, MALAWI, AND ZAMBIA

In February and March 2014 the Southern Africa Litigation Centre, the National Association of Women Judges and Magistrates (Botswana) and the judiciaries in Malawi and Zambia co-hosted judicial colloquia on the rights of vulnerable groups. The colloquia provided a unique opportunity for judges to discuss and debate the development of …» Read More

Kingaipe et al v. Attorney-General (High Court 2010)

Stanley Kingaipe and Charles Chookole joined the Zambian Air Force (ZAF) in June and July of 1989, respectively. Between 2001 and 2002, both underwent compulsory medical exams without being informed they were being tested for HIV. The men tested positive for HIV and were prescribed antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). However, according to their testimoney they were neither informed of their HIV-positive status, nor advised on the nature of the prescribed drugs. They were ultimately discharged in October 2002.» Read More